Friday, April 22, 2011

Be2a: Part 1

The Goal: A BE2a
Years ago I purchased a CD on-line from the USA which was a paper model aeroplane plan and instructions for a BE2a. I'm still not sure if there is any other model available for this airframe but there wasn't at the time of purchase. Now that I intend embarking on a WWI aviation campaign, my Avro 504 is going to need an escort or two. I have already built the model previously in 1/48 scale and this is proving to be a useful guide for my 1/72 assembly.

Attempt at paper fuselage.

I started out by printing off two copies of the plane on thin card stock and am building two aircraft.  If I'm going to the effort of building one, I might as well have two. Together with the 504, it will give me a flight of three aircraft which is as many as I'd ever need. Almost from the beginning, it became apparent that my assembly of this paper model wasn't working well - the folding at this scale is fiddly and mistakes are easy - too easy.

First rough cut and markings

I have now opted to build a balsa fuselage based off the plane and will replace as many parts with alternate, rigid materials wherever possible. In short, the paper model wings and tail assembly will most likely be the only 'supplied' parts I will use. My fuselage is based on 10x10mm balsa stock, marked up using the paper model pattern and cut on my band saw. The cockpits are drilled using a 6.5mm bit and modified with a scalpel.

Taking shape

There has been considerable sanding and filing with an emery board and panel details applied with a 2B pencil. I originally had not allowed for sufficient rise at the top of the fuselage so have had to re-build with some 3mm balsa strip, file back and re-mark. The images in this posting are of the previous, low-profile fuselage which are just not right when compared to the original photo above.

Right shape, too low a profile

I had attempted to make the engine block using Green Stuff but it wasn't really working for me so I will assemble the card engine which, whilst fiddly and time consuming will provide me with the precise dimensions I require. I salvaged my Green Stuff by rolling them into long strips and looping them into what look like miniature curtain rings for the undercarriage tyres. My aim is to make the central structure as rigid as possible to take the strain of my rigging. The great thing about the CD plan is its inclusion of a rigging guide which takes the guess work out of the process.

3 comments:

  1. О!Самостоятельно делаете самолет!Уважаю!Какими чертежами пользуетесь?

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  2. It looks like a fun project. I look forward to seeing the next stage of construction. I have never had the patience to work in paper. My choice of material was laminated styrene sheets. that way I could pull a RTV silicone mold of the master so I could make new bits quickly in urethane resin,or a product called "Water Putty" which cured rock hard.

    Cheers

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  3. you are a sick sick man.....looking forward to shooting them down ....you blagard!

    cheers
    Matt

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